The Best of 2016

See the 2015 post here!

Here is my second installment of the best things I’ve found, learned, read, etc. These things are listed in no particular order, and may not necessarily be new.

This annual “Best Of” series is inspired by @fogus and his blog, Send More Paramedics.

Favorite Blog Posts Read

Articles I’ve Written for Other Publications

I’ve continued to write for a few different outlets, and still find it a lot of fun. Here is the total list for 2016.

Favorite Technical Books Read

I haven’t read as much this year as previously

  • The Cathedral & the Bazaar: Musings on Linux and Open Source by an Accidental Revolutionary – Really cool book about early community software development practices (at least that’s what I got out of it). Also covers some interesting history on the start of time-sharing systems and move to open-source platforms.
  • Computer Lib – An absolute classic, the original how-to book for a new computer user, written by Ted Nelson. I managed to track down a copy for a *reasonable* price and read the Computer Lib portion. Still need to get through Dream Machines.

Favorite Non-Technical Books Read

Number of Books Read

5.5

Favorite Music Discovered

Favorite Television Shows

Black Mirror (2011), Game of Thrones (2011) , Westworld (2016)

Programming Languages Used for Work/Personal

Java, JavaScript, Python, Perl, Objective-C.

Programming Languages I Want To Use Next Year

  • Common Lisp – A “generalized” Lisp dialect.
  • Clojure – A Lisp dialect that runs on the Java Virtual Machine
  • Go – Really interested to see how this scales with concurrent network programming.
  • Crystal – Speedy like go, pretty syntax.

Still Need to Read

Dream Machines, Literary Machines, Design Patterns, 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10

Life Events of 2016

  • Got married.
  • Became a homeowner.

Life Changing Technologies Discovered

  • Amazon Echo – Not revolutionary, but has a lot of potential to change the way people interact with computers more so than Siri or Google Now. The fact that I can keep this appliance around and work with it hands free gives me a taste of how we may interact with the majority of our devices within the next decade.
  • IPFS – A distributed peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol. May one day replace torrents, but for now it is fun to play with.
  • Matrix – A distributed communication platform, works really well as an IRC bridge or replacement. Really interested to see where it will go. Anyone can set up a federated homeserver and join the network.

Favorite Subreddits

/r/cyberpunk, /r/sysadmin, /r/darknetplan

Completed in 2016

Plans for 2017

  • Write for stuff I’ve written for already (NODE, Lunchmeat, Exolymph, 2600)
  • Write for new stuff (Neon Dystopia, Active Wirehead, ???, [your project here])
  • Set up a public OpenNIC tier 2 server.
  • Participate in more public server projects (ntp pool, dn42, etc.)
  • Continue work for Philly Mesh.
  • Do some FPGA projects to get more in-depth with hardware.
  • Organization, organization, organization!
  • Documentation.
  • Reboot Raunchy Taco IRC.

See you in 2017!

 

rtmbot-archivebotjr – A Slack Bot for Archiving

I’ve been working with the idea of trying to archive more things when I’m on the go. Sometimes I find myself with odd pockets of time like 10 minutes on a train platform or a few minutes leftover at lunch that I tend to spend browsing online. Inevitably, I find something I want to download later and tuck the link away, usually forgetting all about it.

Recently, I’ve been using Slack for some team collaboration projects (Slack is sort of like IRC in a nice pretty package, integrating with helpful online services) and was wondering how I could leverage it for some on-the-go archiving needs.

Slack has released their own bot, python-rtmbot on GitHub that you can run on your own server and pull into your Slack site to do bot things. The bot includes a few sample plugins (written in Python), but I went about creating my own to get some remote archiving features and scratch my itch.

The fruit of my labor also lives on GitHub as rtmbot-archivebotjr. This is not to be confused with Archive Team’s ArchiveBot (I just stink at unique names). archivebotjr will sit in your Slack channels waiting for you to give it a command. The most useful are likely !youtube-dl (for downloading youtube videos in the highest quality), !wget (for downloading things through wget. Great when I find a disk image and don’t want to download it on my phone), and !torsocks-wget (Like !wget but over TOR). I have a few more in there for diagnostics (!ping and !uptime), but you can see a whole list on the GitHub page.

Screenshot_2016-02-25-09-55-50

Right now, the bot is basic and lacks a wide array of features. The possibilities for other tools that can link into this are endless, and I hope to link more in periodically. Either way, you can easily download all sorts of files relatively easily and the bot seems reasonably stable for an initial release.

If you can fit this bot into your archiving workflow, try it out and let me know how it goes. Can it better fit your needs? Is something broken? Do you want to add a feature?

I want to hear about it!