The Best of 2017

Here is my third installment of the best things I’ve found, learned, read, etc. over the past year. These things are listed in no particular order, and may not necessarily be new.

See the 2016 post here!
See the 2015 post here!

This annual “Best Of” series is inspired by @fogus and his blog, Send More Paramedics.

Favorite Blog Posts Read

I end up reading a lot of articles over the course of the year, and cannot possibly remember all of them. Here is a good selection of that ones that I can recall:

Articles I’ve Written for Other Publications

I’ve continued to write for a few different places outside of my own site. Here is a complete list for 2017:

Favorite Technical Books Read

Favorite Non-Technical Books Read

  • Daemon (2006) – Awesome techno-thriller about an autonomous piece of software that slowly starts taking over the world. The book follows those who are trying to stop the daemon program, and those the daemon employs.

Number of Books Read

This year was noticeably disappointing when it came to number of books read. This is likely due to an increase in the amount of podcasts I now listen to.

3

Still Need to Read

Dream Machines, Literary Machines, Design Patterns, 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10

Favorite Music Discovered

Favorite Television Shows

Black Mirror (2011), Game of Thrones (2011) , Mr. Robot (2015), Halt & Catch Fire (2014), Twin Peaks (2017)

Favorite Podcasts

Reply All, TLDR, 99% Invisible, Jason Scott Talks His Way Out of It

Programming Languages Used for Work/Personal

Java, JavaScript, Python,Objective-C.

Programming Languages I Want To Use Next Year

  • Common Lisp – A “generalized” Lisp dialect.
  • Go – Sounds like fun for network-oriented programming.

Life Events of 2017

  • Visited NYC, New York.
  • Visited Nashville, Tennessee.

Life Changing Technologies Discovered

  • PC Engines – I recently got an apu2c4 and am impressed by this single-board computer. While I am just experimenting with it right now, the gigabit NICs should prove to help make a great pfSense router.
  • Orange Pi Zero – Not as fast as a Raspberry Pi, but for $9USD, this little board can be used for many, many small and inexpensive projects.
  • Mastodon – A really nifty federated social networking software package similar to Twitter that I don’t use as much as I should.

Favorite Subreddits

/r/darknetplan, /r/cyberpunk, /r/homelab

Completed in 2017

Plans for 2018

  • Write for stuff I’ve written for already (NODE, Lunchmeat, Exolymph, Neon Dystopia,  2600).
  • Write for new stuff (Do you have a publication that needs writers?).
  • Publish article backlog. I have around 10 articles I have written or partially written that are not online yet.
  • Read more books.
  • Participate in more public server projects (ntp pool, etc.).
  • Continue work for Philly Mesh.
  • Do some FPGA projects to get more in-depth with hardware.
  • Organization, organization, organization!
  • Documentation.
  • Continue rebooting Raunchy Taco IRC (Have one server and a certificate authority configured).
  • Create a new SKS keyserver.
  • Assemble an RC2014.

See you in 2018!

 

Bypass Your ISP’s DNS & Run A Private OpenNIC Server (2600 Article)

Now that the article has been printed in 2600 magazine, Volume 34, Issue 3 (2017-10-02), I’m able to republish it on the web. The article below is my submission to 2600 with some slight formatting changes and minor edits.

Bypass Your ISP’s DNS & Run A Private OpenNIC Server
By Mike Dank
Famicoman@gmail.com

Introduction

With recent U.S. legislation regarding Internet privacy, we see another example of control moving away from consumers and towards service providers. Following the news of this change, many have taken a renewed interest in methods that can take back some of the control and privacy that ISPs and other organizations have slowly been chipping away.

One such service that consumers can liberate (and run) for themselves is DNS. The Domain Name System is responsible for retrieving IP addresses (like 123.45.67.89) from domain names (like 2600.com). For a simplified explanation, when you go to visit a website your machine hasn’t seen before, your machine will query a caching server that is usually owned by your ISP or a company like Google or OpenDNS. This server will return the proper IP address, if they have it cached, or query its way along a chain of DNS servers to the authoritative one controlling that domain. Once found, the IP address for the domain entered will trickle back to you and complete the initial request, allowing your machine to resolve it.

Companies that control these services have a direct look into the sites you are trying to visit. You can bet that more than just a few of them are logging queries and using them for marketing purposes or creating profiles based on who is sitting behind the keyboard at the address of origin. However, there are alternative DNS providers out there who can offer more privacy than others are willing to supply.

One such project, OpenNIC, has been operating a network of DNS servers for many years. Unlike traditional DNS providers, OpenNIC provides an alternate root to the ICANN system (which resolves traditional TLDs, top level domains like .com, .net, etc.) while maintaining backwards compatibility with them. Using OpenNIC, you can still resolve all of the same sites, but also get access to those run by OpenNIC operators, with TLDs such as .geek, .pirate, and .bbs. OpenNIC is made up of hobbyists, engineers, and tinkerers who not only want to explore the ins and outs of DNS, but also offer enhanced privacy and free domain registration for TLDs within their root! You may see OpenNIC as just-another-organization to query, but many operators are privacy-oriented, running their own servers devoid of logging and/or in countries that don’t poke around in your network traffic.

Aside from using an official OpenNIC DNS server to query your home traffic against directly, you can also set one up yourself. Using a modest VPS (512MB of RAM, 4GB of disk) hosted somewhere outside of the US (or the 14-eyes jurisdiction, if you prefer), you can subvert organizations who may be nefariously gathering information from your queries. While your server will still ultimately connect upstream to an OpenNIC server, any clients at home or on the go never will — they will only directly query your new DNS server directly.

Installation & Configuration

Setting up a DNS server is relatively easy to do with just a basic understanding of the shell. I’m running a Debian system, so some of the configuration may be different depending on the distribution you are running. Additionally, the steps below are for configuring a BIND server. There are many different DNS server packages out there to choose from, though BIND is arguably the most widespread on GNU/Linux hosts.

After logging into our server we will first want to switch to the root account to configure BIND.

$ su -

Next, we will install bind9 and DNS utilities using the package manager. This will automatically configure a (non-publicly accessible) DNS server for us to work with and various DNS tools that will aid in setting up the server (specifically, dig).

$ apt-get install bind9 dnsutils -y

Now, we will pull down the OpenNIC root hints file for BIND to use. The root hints file simply contains information about OpenNIC’s root DNS servers that control the alternative TLDs OpenNIC has to offer (as well as provide backwards compatibility to ICANN domains). On Debian, we save this information to ‘/etc/bind/db.root’ for BIND to access.

$ dig . NS @75.127.96.89 > /etc/bind/db.root

While the root hints information does not change often, new TLDs can be added to OpenNIC periodically. We will set up a cron job that updates this file once a month (you can specify this to be more frequent is you wish) at 12:00AM on the first of the month. Let’s edit the crontab to add this recurring job.

$ crontab -e

At the bottom of the file, paste the following and save, activating our job.

0 0 1 * * /usr/bin/dig . NS @75.127.96.89 > /etc/bind/db.root

Next, we will want to make some changes to the BIND configuration files. Specifically, we will allow recursive queries (so our BIND installation can query the OpenNIC root servers), enable DNSSEC validation (to verify integrity of DNS data on query to OpenNIC servers), and whitelist our client’s IP address. Edit ‘/etc/bind/named.conf.options’ and replace the contents with the following options block, making any edits as needed to specify a client’s IP address.

options {        
    directory "/var/cache/bind";

    //Allow localhost and a client IP of 1.2.3.4        
    allow-query { localhost; 1.2.3.4; };        
    recursion yes;

    dnssec-enable yes;        
    dnssec-validation yes;        
    dnssec-lookaside auto;

    auth-nxdomain no;    # conform to RFC1035        
    listen-on-v6 { any; };  //Only use if your server has an ipv6 iface! 
};

Now, we will also change the logging configuration so that no logs are kept for any queries to our server. This is beneficial in that we know our own queries will never be logged on our server (as well as queries from anyone else we might authorize to use our server at a later date) for any reason. To make this change, edit ‘/etc/bind/named.conf’ and add the following logging block to the bottom of the file.

logging {
    category default { null; };
};

Finally, restart BIND so it can use our new configuration.

$ /etc/init.d/bind9 restart

Now, make sure that our server is using itself for DNS by checking the ‘/etc/resolv.conf’ file. If it doesn’t exist already, place the following line above any other lines starting with “nameserver”.

nameserver 127.0.0.1

Testing resolution of both OpenNIC and ICANN TLDs can be done with a few simple ping commands.

$ ping -c4 2600.com 
$ ping -c4 opennic.glue

Conclusion & Next Steps

Now that the server is in place, you are free to configure your client machine(s), home router, etc. to make use of the new DNS server. Provided you have port 53 open for both UDP and TCP on the server’s firewall, you should be able to add a similar ‘nameserver’ line to the ‘/etc/resolv.conf’ file (as seen in the previous section) on any authorized client machine, using the server’s external IP address instead of the loopback ‘127.0.0.1’ address.
Instructions for DNS configuration on many different operating systems and devices are readily available from a myriad of sources online if you aren’t using a Linux-based client machine. Upon successful configuration, your client should be able to execute the two ping commands in the previous section, verifying a proper setup!

As always, be sure to take precautions and secure your server if you have not done so already. With a functioning DNS server now configured, this project could be expanded upon (as a follow-up exercise/article) by implementing a tool such as DNSCrypt to authenticate and secure your DNS traffic.

Sources

 

How to Run your Own Independent DNS with Custom TLDs

This article was originally written for and published at N-O-D-E on September 9th, 2015. It has been posted here for safe keeping.

HOW TO RUN YOUR OWN INDEPENDENT DNS WITH CUSTOM TLDS

BACKGROUND

After reading what feels like yet another article about a BitTorrent tracker losing its domain name, I started to think about how trackers could have an easier time keeping a stable domain if they didn’t have to register their domain through conventional methods Among their many roles, The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), controls domain names on the Internet and are well known for the work with the Domain Name System (DNS) specifically the operation of root name servers and governance over top level domains (TLDs).

If you ever register a domain name, you pick a name you like and head over to an ICANN-approved registrar. Let’s say I want my domain to be “n-o-d-e.net”. I see if I can get a domain with “n-o-d-e” affixed to the TLD “.net” and after I register it, I’m presented with an easy-to-remember identification string which can be used by anyone in the world to access my website. After I map my server’s IP address to the domain, I wait for the new entry to propagate. This means that the records for my domain are added/updated in my registrar’s records. When someone wants to visit my website, they type out “n-o-d-e.net” in their address bar of their browser and hit the enter key. In the background, their set name server (usually belonging to the ISP) checks to see who controls records for this domain, and then works its way through the DNS infrastructure to retrieve the IP address matching this domain name and returns it back to you.

It’s a reliable, structured system, but it is still controlled by an organization who has been known to retract domains from whoever they like. What if you could resolve domains without going through this central system? What if there was a way to keep sites readily accessible without some sort of governing organization being in control?

I’m not the first to think of answers to these questions. Years ago, there was a project called Dot-P2P which aimed to offer “.p2p” TLDs to peer-to-peer websites as a way of protecting them against losing their domains. While the project had notable backing by Peter Sunde of The Pirate Bay, it eventually stagnated and dissolved into obscurity.

The organization that would have handled the “.p2p” domain registrations, OpenNIC, is still active and working on an incredible project itself. OpenNIC believes that DNS should be neutral, free, protective of your privacy, and devoid of government intervention. OpenNIC also offers new custom TLDs such as “.geek” and “.free” which you won’t find offered through ICANN. Anyone can apply for a domain and anyone can visit one of the domains registered through OpenNIC provided they use an OpenNIC DNS server, which is also backwards-compatible with existing ICANN-controlled TLDs. No need to say goodbye to your favorite .com or .net sites.

If you have the technical know-how to run your own root name server and submit a request to OpenNIC’s democratic body, you too could manage your own TLD within their established infrastructure.

Other projects like NameCoin aim to solve the issue of revoked domains by storing domain data for its flagship “.bit” TLD within its blockchain. The potential use cases for NameCoin take a radical shift from simple domain registrations when you consider what developers have already implemented for storing assets like user data in the blockchain alongside domain registrations.

But what if I wanted to run my own TLD without anyone’s involvement or support, and still be completely free of ICANN control? Just how easy is it to run your own TLD on your own root name server and make it accessible to others around the world?

INTRODUCTION

It turns out that running your own DNS server and offering custom TLDs is not as difficult as it first appears. Before I set out to work on this project, I listed some key points that I wanted to make sure I hit:

– Must be able to run my own top level domain
– Must be able to have the root server be accessible by other machines
– Must be backwards compatible with existing DNS

Essentially, I wanted my own TLD so I didn’t conflict with any existing domains, the ability for others to resolve domains using my TLD, and the ability for anyone using my DNS to get to all the other sites they would normally want to visit (like n-o-d-e.net).

REQUIRED

For this guide, you are going to need a Linux machine (a virtual machine or Raspberry Pi will work fine). My Linux machine is running Debian. Any Linux distribution should be fine for the job, if you use something other than Debian you may have to change certain commands. You will also want a secondary machine to test your DNS server. I am using a laptop running Windows 7.

Knowledge of networking and the Linux command line may aid you, but is not necessarily required.

CHOOSING A DNS PACKAGE

I needed DNS software to run on my Linux machine, and decided upon an old piece of software called BIND. BIND has been under criticism lately because of various vulnerabilities, so make sure that you read up on any issues BIND may be experiencing and understand the precautions as you would with any other software you may want to expose publicly. I am not responsible if you put an insecure piece of software facing the internet and get exploited.

It is important to note that I will be testing everything for this project on my local network. A similar configuration should work perfectly for any internet-facing server.

Other DNS software exists out there, but I chose BIND because it is something of a standard with thousands of servers running it daily in a production environment. Don’t discount other DNS packages! They may be more robust or secure and are definitely something to consider for a similar project.

HOW-TO GUIDE:

Step 1. Initial Configuration

Connect your Linux machine to the network and check the network interface status.

ifconfig

The response to the command should look similar to this:

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr f0:0d:de:ad:be:ef
                         inet addr:192.168.1.12  Bcast:192.168.1.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
                         UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
                         RX packets:8209495 errors:0 dropped:386 overruns:0 frame:0
                         TX packets:9097071 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
                         collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
                         RX bytes:2124485459 (1.9 GiB)  TX bytes:1695684733 (1.5 GiB)

Make sure your system is up-to-date before we install anything.

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

Step 2. Installing & Configuring BIND

Change to the root user and install BIND version 9. Then stop the service.

su -
apt-get install bind9
/etc/init.d/bind9 stop

Now that BIND is installed and not running, let’s create a new zone file for our custom TLD. For this example, I will be using “.node” as my TLD but feel free to use any TLD of your choosing.

cd /etc/bind
nano node.zone

Paste the following into the file and edit any values you may see fit, including adding any domains with corresponding IP addresses. For a full explanation of these options visit http://www.zytrax.com/books/dns/ch6/mydomain.html which has a nice write-up on the format of a zone file. I did find that I needed to specify a NS SOA record with a corresponding A record or BIND would not start.

As you see below, a lot of this zone file is boilerplate but I did specify a record for “google” which signifies that “google.node” will point to the IP address “8.8.8.8.”

When you are done editing, save the file with CTRL-X.

       ;
       ; BIND data file for TLD “.node”
       ;
       $TTL    604800  ; (1 week)
       @       IN      SOA     node. root.node. (
       2015091220      ; serial (timestamp)
       604800          ; refresh (1 week)
       86400           ; retry (1 day)
       2419200         ; expire (28 days)
       604800 )        ; minimum (1 week)
       ;
       @         IN    NS    ns1.node.    ; this is required
       ;@        IN    A       0.0.0.0         ; unused right now, semicolon comments out the line
       google  IN    A       8.8.8.8
       ns1       IN    A       0.0.0.0         ; this is also required

Now, we need to edit the default zones configuration file to include our new zone.

nano named.conf.default-zones

A the bottom, paste the following block to add our new zone to the configuration.

zone “node.” {
                       type master;
                       file “/etc/bind/node.zone”;
                       allow-transfer { any;};
                       allow-query { any;};
};

Now find the block in the file similar to the below:

zone “.” {
               type hint;
               file “/etc/bind/db.root”;
};

Replace this block with the following to make our root server a slave to master root server 75.127.96.89. This is one of OpenNIC’s public DNS servers and by marking it as a master, we can also resolve OpenNIC TLDs as well as any TLDs under control of ICANN.

zone “.” in {
                  type slave;
                  file “/etc/bind/db.root”;
                  masters { 75.127.96.89; };
                 notify no;
  };

After saving the file, we want to generate a new root hints file which queries OpenNIC. This can be done with the dig command.

dig . NS @75.127.96.89 > /etc/bind/db.root

Finally, restart BIND.

/etc/init.d/bind9 restart

You should see:

[ ok ] Starting domain name service…: bind9.

Configuration on the server on your Linux machine is now done!

Step 3. Configure Other Machines to Use Your Server

On your Windows machine (on the same local network), visit the Network Connections panel by going to Control Panel -> Network and Internet -> Network Connections.

Right-click on your current network connection and select Properties. On the resulting Network Connection Properties dialog, select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) if you are using IPv4 for your local network or Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6). Since I am using IPv4, I will be selecting the former.

Next, click the Properties button. On the resulting Internet Protocol Properties dialog, select the radio button for “Use the following DNS server addresses.” Enter the IP address of your Linux machine in the Preferred DNS server box (192.168.1.12 from my example, but make sure you use the IP address of your Linux machine) and then click the OK button. Back on the Network Connection Properties dialog, click the Close button.

Now, load up a command shell and ping one of our defined domains.

ping google.node

You should see the following:

Pinging google.node [8.8.8.8] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=15ms TTL=55
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=17ms TTL=55
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=16ms TTL=55

Congratulations, you now have a DNS server which will not only resolve your custom TLD but be accessible to other machines.

NEXT STEPS

This is just a proof of concept, and could easily be expanded upon for future projects. If you are wondering where to go from here, you could easily move on to make your DNS publicly accessible and expand the offerings. Further, you could construct multiple DNS nodes to act as slaves or links to your root server as a method of distributing the network to make it more reliable and geographically accessible

While I don’t think many BitTorrent trackers will be quick to adopt a system such as this, it still shows that you can create and resolve custom TLDs which may be useful for constructing alternative networks.

SOURCES

http://wiki.opennicproject.org/Tier2ConfigBindHint
http://timg.ws/2008/07/31/how-to-run-your-own-top-level-domain/
http://www.unixmen.com/setup-dns-server-debian-7-wheezy/

––
BY MIKE DANK (@FAMICOMAN)