The Best of 2017

Here is my third installment of the best things I’ve found, learned, read, etc. over the past year. These things are listed in no particular order, and may not necessarily be new.

See the 2016 post here!
See the 2015 post here!

This annual “Best Of” series is inspired by @fogus and his blog, Send More Paramedics.

Favorite Blog Posts Read

I end up reading a lot of articles over the course of the year, and cannot possibly remember all of them. Here is a good selection of that ones that I can recall:

Articles I’ve Written for Other Publications

I’ve continued to write for a few different places outside of my own site. Here is a complete list for 2017:

Favorite Technical Books Read

Favorite Non-Technical Books Read

  • Daemon (2006) – Awesome techno-thriller about an autonomous piece of software that slowly starts taking over the world. The book follows those who are trying to stop the daemon program, and those the daemon employs.

Number of Books Read

This year was noticeably disappointing when it came to number of books read. This is likely due to an increase in the amount of podcasts I now listen to.

3

Still Need to Read

Dream Machines, Literary Machines, Design Patterns, 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10

Favorite Music Discovered

Favorite Television Shows

Black Mirror (2011), Game of Thrones (2011) , Mr. Robot (2015), Halt & Catch Fire (2014), Twin Peaks (2017)

Favorite Podcasts

Reply All, TLDR, 99% Invisible, Jason Scott Talks His Way Out of It

Programming Languages Used for Work/Personal

Java, JavaScript, Python,Objective-C.

Programming Languages I Want To Use Next Year

  • Common Lisp – A “generalized” Lisp dialect.
  • Go – Sounds like fun for network-oriented programming.

Life Events of 2017

  • Visited NYC, New York.
  • Visited Nashville, Tennessee.

Life Changing Technologies Discovered

  • PC Engines – I recently got an apu2c4 and am impressed by this single-board computer. While I am just experimenting with it right now, the gigabit NICs should prove to help make a great pfSense router.
  • Orange Pi Zero – Not as fast as a Raspberry Pi, but for $9USD, this little board can be used for many, many small and inexpensive projects.
  • Mastodon – A really nifty federated social networking software package similar to Twitter that I don’t use as much as I should.

Favorite Subreddits

/r/darknetplan, /r/cyberpunk, /r/homelab

Completed in 2017

Plans for 2017

  • Write for stuff I’ve written for already (NODE, Lunchmeat, Exolymph, Neon Dystopia,  2600).
  • Write for new stuff (Do you have a publication that needs writers?).
  • Publish article backlog. I have around 10 articles I have written or partially written that are not online yet.
  • Read more books.
  • Participate in more public server projects (ntp pool, etc.).
  • Continue work for Philly Mesh.
  • Do some FPGA projects to get more in-depth with hardware.
  • Organization, organization, organization!
  • Documentation.
  • Continue rebooting Raunchy Taco IRC (Have one server and a certificate authority configured).
  • Create a new SKS keyserver.
  • Assemble an RC2014.

See you in 2018!

 

The Best of 2016

See the 2015 post here!

Here is my second installment of the best things I’ve found, learned, read, etc. These things are listed in no particular order, and may not necessarily be new.

This annual “Best Of” series is inspired by @fogus and his blog, Send More Paramedics.

Favorite Blog Posts Read

Articles I’ve Written for Other Publications

I’ve continued to write for a few different outlets, and still find it a lot of fun. Here is the total list for 2016.

Favorite Technical Books Read

I haven’t read as much this year as previously

  • The Cathedral & the Bazaar: Musings on Linux and Open Source by an Accidental Revolutionary – Really cool book about early community software development practices (at least that’s what I got out of it). Also covers some interesting history on the start of time-sharing systems and move to open-source platforms.
  • Computer Lib – An absolute classic, the original how-to book for a new computer user, written by Ted Nelson. I managed to track down a copy for a *reasonable* price and read the Computer Lib portion. Still need to get through Dream Machines.

Favorite Non-Technical Books Read

Number of Books Read

5.5

Favorite Music Discovered

Favorite Television Shows

Black Mirror (2011), Game of Thrones (2011) , Westworld (2016)

Programming Languages Used for Work/Personal

Java, JavaScript, Python, Perl, Objective-C.

Programming Languages I Want To Use Next Year

  • Common Lisp – A “generalized” Lisp dialect.
  • Clojure – A Lisp dialect that runs on the Java Virtual Machine
  • Go – Really interested to see how this scales with concurrent network programming.
  • Crystal – Speedy like go, pretty syntax.

Still Need to Read

Dream Machines, Literary Machines, Design Patterns, 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10

Life Events of 2016

  • Got married.
  • Became a homeowner.

Life Changing Technologies Discovered

  • Amazon Echo – Not revolutionary, but has a lot of potential to change the way people interact with computers more so than Siri or Google Now. The fact that I can keep this appliance around and work with it hands free gives me a taste of how we may interact with the majority of our devices within the next decade.
  • IPFS – A distributed peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol. May one day replace torrents, but for now it is fun to play with.
  • Matrix – A distributed communication platform, works really well as an IRC bridge or replacement. Really interested to see where it will go. Anyone can set up a federated homeserver and join the network.

Favorite Subreddits

/r/cyberpunk, /r/sysadmin, /r/darknetplan

Completed in 2016

Plans for 2017

  • Write for stuff I’ve written for already (NODE, Lunchmeat, Exolymph, 2600)
  • Write for new stuff (Neon Dystopia, Active Wirehead, ???, [your project here])
  • Set up a public OpenNIC tier 2 server.
  • Participate in more public server projects (ntp pool, dn42, etc.)
  • Continue work for Philly Mesh.
  • Do some FPGA projects to get more in-depth with hardware.
  • Organization, organization, organization!
  • Documentation.
  • Reboot Raunchy Taco IRC.

See you in 2017!

 

Site/Project Updates

You may have noticed that some of my sites are now sporting forced https and ipv6 support. Here’s a little rundown of upgrades and updates.

  • famicoman.com – Forced https and ipv6, software updated. Fixed some broken static sites I’ve had available. ChannelEM, Techtat, and other old projects are available through their own subdomains and indexed on this page, https://static.famicoman.com/
  • noobelodeon.org, elcycle.org – Forced https and ipv6. All subdomains have the same treatment.
  • anarchivism.org – Forced https and ipv6, software updated. Now has a static subdomain for sites I’ve mirrored, https://static.anarchivism.org/
  • raunchytaco.com – Forced https and ipv6. Temporarily disabled the quote database as it is not compatible with the latest PHP. I am looking into Chirpy as an alternative.
  • obsoleet.com – After being down for a while, I’ve restored the site. Forced https and ipv6, software updated.

 

I’m currently splitting my time between writing, doing a little for mesh.philly2600.net, server migrations, and rebuilding Raunchy Taco. Let me know if anything is broken!

 

 

[WANTED] Language Technology / Electric Word Magazine

Language Technology / Electric Word was a technology magazine running from 1987 to 1990, edied by Louis Rossetto who later went on to start Wired Magazine.

Unfortunately, I can’t find any issues of these publications, and little is available online beyond the Wikipedia page which states:

Electric Word was a bimonthly, English-language magazine published in Amsterdam between 1987 and 1990 that offered eclectic reporting on the translation industry, linguistic technology, and computer culture. Its editor was Louis Rossetto.

The magazine was launched under the title Language Technology by a translation company in Amsterdam, INK International. It was later renamed Electric Word and sold to a small Dutch media company. The magazine was terminated in 1990 due to insufficient revenues.

Electric Word was one of the first magazines published using desktop publishing software. It featured avant-garde graphics by the Dutch graphic designer Max Kisman.

After the failure of Electric Word, Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe moved to San Francisco, California and established Wired Magazine.

Luckily, there is a defunct website located at http://rynne.org/electricword. Though the website is dead, we can see some cached information with the help of the Wayback Machine. Looking at this cached version of the site, https://web.archive.org/web/20100308041827/http://www.rynne.org/electricword, we can see some information about the publication and also note that some issues were released for PDF download. These are: #3, #5, #7, #20.

The PDFs were originally hosted at:

http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew3.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew5.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew7.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew20.pdf

Now long gone, I can find no trace of these PDFs or even any issues online for sale.

Any help or information about locating any issues would be extremely helpful! We’re looking at a lost prototype for Wired magazine.

 

[WANTED] Chromed Pork Radio

Recently, I’ve been on the hunt for cyberpunk podcasts. Between the sci-fi dramas and current news shows, I found a surprising amount of references to Chromed Pork, an interesting podcast by a group of phone phreaks and hackers that ran for 22 episodes from early 2008 to early 2009.

Chromed Pork seems to have started out as a group of friends on IRC. They came together (originally or later I don’t know) on Binary Revolution, a hacking website which previously ran the popular Binary Revolution Radio show and published its own zine. The radio show has since been merged into Hacker Public Radio, though BinRev is kept alive through forums and IRC. I have been a member of the BinRev forums for 10 years now and missed this show when it first premiered. In 2008, the podcast scene was more immature but still well established. There was an explosion of content and it proved hard to keep up.

Chromed Pork Radio Logo

Chromed Pork Radio Logo

The BinRev forums do have archival posts, and I can find accounts for three hosts of Chromed Pork Radio: Multi-Mode, tacomaster, and Inode. Communication with them seems difficult. The most recent login date for any of these three accounts is 2010, and tacomaster’s email address on his profile returns as unreachable if you try to push to it.

I did a little more digging on Chromed Pork’s old blogspot site which contains old number scans and podcast show notes. I found links to episodes that have since died, apparently hosted on a “mobile-node.net” domain. This domain now points to yet another domain, but I’m not sure of that domain owner’s involvement if any. I’ve reached out to him and still hope to hear back one way or the other, but no word yet. I also found an old Chromed Pork general email address, but this too is deactivated.

Later, I reached out to /u/r3dk1ng on Reddit whom I saw posting about Chromed Pork, and he was able to get me a good amount (15/22) of episodes which I have since put on the Internet Archive here.

For reference, here is a list of the files I am still looking for:

ChromedPork-0012-Assorted_Bullsh-t.mp3
ChromedPork-0013-Phreaking.mp3
ChromedPork-0014-Guest-Wesley_Mcgrew.mp3
ChromedPork-0015-Newscasting.mp3
ChromedPork-0018-Porktopia_Election-Night.mp3
ChromedPork-0019-MC-Colo_and_other_news.mp3
ChromedPork-0020-Killing_Time.mp3

And here is a description of the podcast from the defunct radio.chromedpork.net site:

Chromed Pork Radio is an open information security “podcast”, featuring a variety of security related topics, such Info and Comms Sec, Telephony, Programming, Electronics and Amateur Radio. We do our best to work on an open contribution model, meaning any listener is a potential host. We do not censor our shows but do ask that contributors keep all contributions purely informational or hypothetical. Contributions should consist only of material the contributor is legally entitled to share.
Given our open uncensored model, the views and opinions expressed in this “podcast” are strictly those of the contributor. The contents of this “podcast” are not reviewed or approved by Chromed Pork Media.
If you would like to contribute, or provided feedback please visit our contribute section for details.

My trail has gone cold, and I’m still on the lookout for the remaining episodes or anyone who may have them.

 

[WANTED] Videostatic (1989)

Through a strange series of links, I have become aware of a 1989 film called Videostatic. Distributed independently for $10/tape, Videostatic looks like some sort of insane hodgepodge of clips and video effects that I am strangely drawn to.

med129

Here is a synopsis written around 1998 from Gareth Branwyn’s Street Tech,

This is a 60-minute audio-visual journey to the edges of alternative art-making and experimental video. The tape is divided up into four sections: “Poems” (intuitive, non-narrative, alogical), “Paintings” (video equivalent to the conventional canvas), “Stories” (Event-based sequences), and “Messages” (rhetorical stances, public “service” announcements). The most impressive pieces here are “Sex with the Dead,” a video memory-jog of our morbidly nostalgic culture by Joe Schwind, “Of Thee I Sing/Sing/Sing,” a musique concrete video by Linda Morgan-Brown and the Tape-Beatles, and “Glossolalia,” (Steve Harp) an absolutely mind-fucking excursion into language, synaesthetic experience, and the structuring of human thought and perception. Surrounded by the curious, the kooky, and the just plain boring (as kook-tech artist Douglass Craft likes to say: “Not every experiment was a success.”) At only $10, this is an insane bargain.

Videostatic compilers John Heck and Lloyd Dunn (of Tape-Beatles’ fame) plan on putting out a series of these tapes. As far as we know, 1989 is the latest release. Write for more info (or to submit material).

ACCESS:
Videostatic
911 North Dodge St.
Iowa City, IA 52245
$10/ 60-minute VHS cassette

I’m looking for this in any format, digital or physical.

I’m not quite sure what I’m in store for.

med130

EDIT: Here is some additional information from the PhotoStatic Archive,

VideoStatic 1989 was released in June, 1989. It is a video compilation along much the same lines as the PhonoStatic cassettes. It contains roughly an hour of video and film work by both networking artists and Iowa City locals. It was edited by John Heck and Lloyd Dunn. At the time of this writing (6/90) VideoStatic 1990 was not yet begun, but plans are underway. It will be edited by Linda-Morgan Brown and Lloyd Dunn.

 

[WANTED] How to Build A Red Box VHS

I was looking though old issues of Blacklisted! 411 and found an advertisement in a 1995 issue for a 60 minute VHS tape about how to build a red box using a Radio Shack pocket tone dialer. For those who don’t know, red boxes were popular in the ’90s and used by phreakers, scammers, and those who just wanted free payphone calls. By modifying pocket dialers (or even just recording sounds that coins made as they were dropped into a phone), anyone could make a red box which would mimic the tones produced when coins were inserted into a payphone. This means that anywhere you take your red box, you can play back the tones and get free phone calls.

Anyway, this video was made and sold in 1995 by East America Company in Englewood, New Jersey. It retailed for $39 (Plus $5 shipping) and I would love a copy. See the image below for a review of the tape and the original advertisement.

redbox

 

[WANTED] Let’s Find All The TechTV VHS Tapes

TechTV, the 24-hour technology-oriented cable channel was a never ending source of inspiration to me when I was growing up. Back then, TechTV was only available in my area on digital cable, a newfangled platform that people didn’t want to pay the extra money for. By the time I had ditched analog cable, TechTV was long gone, absorbed into G4, with any programming carried over reduced to a shell of its former self.

Back in the heyday (2001-2002 for this example), TechTV decided to release direct-to-video VHS tapes of various one-off programs and specials designed as something of an informational/instructional reference. I remember these being advertised, and the concept excited me as it was a way to get TechTV content without needing the cable service. That said, I never got to view a single one of these tapes. Unfortunately, they were priced a just a little too high. It was a big financial investment for an hour of content.

Over a decade later, a few of these tapes have made their way online. By my research, I can find that TechTV produced six (Maybe more?) VHS tapes, three of which some kind souls have digitized and put on YouTube or The Internet Archive. But, that means that there are three other tapes out there which I or anyone else have a hard time getting at unless we want to spend a bunch of money working our way through Amazon resellers. Not something I want to do. To add to this, the digitized videos available online are not the best quality. Again, thanks to the kind souls who went through the trouble, but I would really like to see the maximum quality squeezed out of these bad boys. Over the years, there have been many efforts to find old TechTV recordings from over-the-air, but these tapes remain mostly lost.

Let’s try to fix that.

I’ve created a project page to track as much information as I can on these tapes and am looking for any people who can create digital rips themselves or send these tapes my way to rip. I can’t offer any money to buy them, but you’ll be doing a good service getting these videos out there. Once again, I would like to find fresh sources for each of the tapes listed if possible.

The titles I can find existing are as follows, let me know if I missed any:

  • TechTV’s Digital Audio for the Desktop (2001)
  • TechTV’s How to Build Your Own PC (2001)
  • TechTV’s Digital Video for the Desktop (2002)
  • TechTV Solves Your Computer Problems (2002)
  • TechTV’s How to Build a Website (2002)
  • TechTV’s How to Build a Website (2002)
  •  

    The Summer Backlog

    Every Summer I speculate that I’m going to have an unbelievable amount free time. It will always be so fantastic and freeing. I’ll be done school, working a stress-free job, and there will be so much unscheduled time that I’ll just get bored and come up with hundreds of new tasks for myself.

    This never happens.

    Well, the having-free-time-thing never happens but I do take on new activities anyway. After enough time, I end up with a bunch of things I’ve been meaning to do, and work on them impulsively at sporadic intervals. Everything moves forward, slow and steady, but in an agonizing and chaotic fashion.

    I do make time for my projects, but the available time is fluctuating as the years go by. When I started these projects all I had was time and energy, but no money. Now, I seem to find myself with a modest amount of money and energy, but no time. Eventually, I’m doomed to have time and money, but no energy. This is the vicious cycle, and here I find myself in the second stage.

    Without organization, every project falls on its face. I’m a big proponent of organization, especially when I have so much going on. After a while, you just need to keep track and work smarter (or risk meeting some men who want to put you in a straitjacket). Below, I’ve outlined (to the best of my ability) the various projects I’m working on, and where they need to go next. Hopefully this not only helps me stay on track but also gives you something to yell at me about the next time you see me.

    Obsoleet
    I’ve actually had most of an episode filmed for a long time by this point. The only problem that I faced was the audio cut out at the end of one of the shots. After I redo it, which I wanted to do anyway, the footage should be mostly set to go into editing. Additionally, I’d like to film a little skit for the intro if I can manage it. Editing usually doesn’t take a whole lot of time, though I do want to try out some new software and I have to cut a brand new introduction. High definition video also proves to be more of a hassle and take some more (read unplanned) time.

    Anarchivism
    This one is going along pretty well, especially recently. On the scanning side of things, I have plenty of stuff coming in but not a lot going up. The scanner I have is awful when it comes down to conducting magazine scans and I’ll have to look for something beefier before going full tilt on my library. As an aside, I’ve more or less created the most complete wiki of hacker magazines complete with information on them as far as I can tell. With my current rig, I can pump out some more Blacklisted! 411 issues without much hesitation.

    Going after Revision3 has slowed a little, but I can get back into it with some one-liners soon. Getting to other odds and ends comes and goes as I find them. The only section that could have hours poured into it is the hacker con category. The videos I find not only have different ways of being obtained but also get updated with a new crop annually, so everything is constantly in flux. I’m trying to hunt down some of the more difficult stuff as well as fill in actual information about the conferences. If you want to help out, please do.

    TechTat
    This one is more or less dead due to lack of interest. While it was cool having a collaboration site for retro tech, it lost its luster after a few months. I considered turning TechTat into an audio podcast but I’m not sure how that would turn out. I’m certain I can find some use for the concept.

    ChannelEM
    ChannelEM keeps trucking on, but is prone to frequent crashing. It does seem to get more stable after software updates, but still ultimately hangs. I want to take a look at the scripting done to run the station and see if I can put in any fail-safes to stop the crashing. CEM also needs a rotation update with any new episodes. Further, the idea of getting new shows to join up is a bit fruitless now, but the site does well as it stands. For no real reason at all, I’d like to see if I can add on to the existing scripts and create a JSON API with scheduling information.

    Moonlit has also been working on some very interesting video projects that I’d like to integrate which would completely change the look and feel of both the site and the content.

    Raunchy Taco
    More or less in a standstill. The stability fluctuates and there isn’t that much going on there anyway. The IRC server is really only kept up if Ethan, Pat, and myself need a place to chat. For a network that has been off-and-on for 6-7 years, we have empty periods like this all the time. I’d like to just keep it up if I can.

    The IPTV Archive
    More or less in waiting. I put up a hefty amount of content, and then ultimately mirrored it to Internet Archive where it can live forever. If I had the time, I’d spend it doing more detective work for the missing shows- there is always more detective work to do. There are probably a half dozen more smaller shows I could throw up at some point but nothing too pressing.

    Additionally, when I started the site I used Blip because it had (arguably) the best quality at the time. Now, YouTube has eclipsed it. There was a bit of panic a few months back about some Blip channels being closed down for no reason and I have to entertain the idea that this could happen to me. If that happens, the whole library would likely need to be moved to YouTube. A big move, but likely a nice one for the content.

    Moreover, I’ve also considered moving the content over to Anarchivism as it would be a much more flexible platform.

    House Keeping and Solo Projects
    I enjoy writing and I’d to do more of it. Besides just being more active here, I’d like to get back into writing for other outlets. I’m thinking of more for The New Tech, and another for my local 2600 group. I’ve also been playing around with Medium (I like the concept but it still might be pretentious dribble) and would like to publish another article through it. I’m looking into 2-3 print publications as well if I can come up with the right topics and go into those pieces with the right energy.

    Aside from my web work, I have a bunch of little, lower-profile things going on that I need to get out of the way.

    I recently got a display for my Apple G5, so I can let it run as a capture PC for video transfers. I already have an ADVC box hooked up and the machine captures great… but it needs a monitor hooked up to run. Then, I can do more video transfers which can ultimately pop up in other places (Maybe a found footage section on Anarchivism).

    I want to set up a dedicated headless Linux server for staging web projects amongst other things. I might also have it just run wget scripts all day or some custom web crawlers or who knows what else.

    I have an old cocktail arcade cabinet that needs some love. If the original electronics are beyond repair, it would be nice to outfit the cab with new hardware and set up a MAME machine.

    More Raspberry Pi projects would be nice. I like having the Incredible Pi set up as a PBX but I feel like I could do more with it. I have another Pi set up as a media center that I use often. I’m currently on setting up a Bitcoin mining rig with another and still have many more ideas. Raspberry Pi cluster? Telnet BBS? BBS hooked into the PBX? The possibilities are endless.

    Paranoia kicks in with regard to my data. I have a dozen or so terabytes worth and I need to clean data off of old drives, sort it, duplicate it, and duplicate the data that’s already there. To make matters worse, I’m constantly downloading more.

    A CJDNS Meshnet node has also been in the works for a long time. I tried to set up my first one on a PogoPlug and while I eventually got the software to compile, I couldn’t connect to anybody. It may be time for another try, and possibly on a “normal” box before adapting it to the PogoPlug.

    I’m experimenting with a few more programming languages and development environments. Recently, I’ve looked into running some Go, and am learning a great deal of JavaScript. I’d like to look into C# and also play with the Unity engine. Aside from these, I’m reasonably proficient at Android development and might be tying this in with another project of a friend’s.

    And the list goes on.

     

    There’s a lot of things here- a hell of a lot of things. I’d be lying if I said that there weren’t going to be even more. Hopefully, as I now have a nice little outline, I’ll be able to zero-in my focus and get some work done.

    In the meantime, sit back and enjoy the show.

     

    Saving Rev3 – Update 8 – “Resurrection”

    Yeah, I stole the title from the Halloween series. It seemed fitting.

    So here we are about a year later. Guess what? Revision3 has killed off a few more shows, started a bunch more, and redesigned their site.

    A few days ago, Moonlit and I got into an interesting Twitter conversation with Revision3, the results of which can be found here and here. Basically, with their site redesign they lost a bunch of shows which they then regained after we brought it up. They also claimed to fix some dead links, so some possible good news there. On the negative, they did say that some shows have been removed purposefully. Thankfully I believe I have a copy of everything they’ve taken down to date. On the whole, it felt as though they danced around issues I brought up, but at this point I find it unsurprising. It’s probably a good thing they didn’t Google me while we were talking.

    I checked my download script from last summer, and sure enough it didn’t work. Upon doing a few trials, it’s a simple fix to change “small” to “medium.” So, I went ahead and updated it. This now works perfectly again (woohoo!).

    I went through the wiki page and added in the shows that they had cancelled while I was out of the loop. I’m just going off of their “Archive Shows” page, which may be incomplete, but I don’t know enough about this age of Revision3 to tell you if something is missing or not. It doesn’t look too much as if they throw out shows altogether these days.

    I count 10 more dead shows.

     

    On a similar topic, I’m also finally getting work done with Hack College (One of the baby Rev3 Beta shows) and am in the process of uploading it. Let’s walk through how I did this finally because you might be curious.

    I know that they have the series up on http://blip.tv/hackcollege. This is good for starters. I also know that youtube-dl supports Blip.tv. Excellent. After a little trial and error, I settled on this command:

    youtube-dl -c -i -t http://blip.tv/hackcollege

    This downloads all the videos from the hackcollege account, puts titles in the file names, continues incomplete downloads, and skips errors. I only added that last part because one video gave me an error (I eventually just downloaded it manually). Then, I forgot I wanted descriptions for each video, so I ran this:

    youtube-dl -i -c -t –write-info-json http://blip.tv/hackcollege

    See how easy that was? JSON descriptions in just a few seconds. Okay. A few people still know a little trick for getting RSS from Blip.tv: just add “/rss” after the account url. You can go ahead and load it yourself at http://blip.tv/hackcollege/rss. Now, if you’ve been downloading along, you might notice that youtube-dl only snags the .m4v files and there are these beautiful giant .mov files in the RSS feed. Wouldn’t it be nice to grab these? Unfortunately, you can’t fine-tune youtube-dl for these just yet (maybe if I hunt around in the source code I can set this up, but I honestly didn’t think of that until right now). How do we get these files? I came up with this one-liner:

    curl http://blip.tv/hackcollege/rss | grep -o ‘http.*mov’ | sort | uniq > out.txt

    Pretty self explanatory. Grab the RSS, filter for .mov links, and sort it to get rid of duplicates. Then, save it to a text file. You might notice that the RSS feed doesn’t contain links for every video. There really isn’t anything we can do about that, but it does appear that the .mov files were a semi-recent addition to these videos and earlier videos most likely don’t have the option. I’d say it’s a pretty safe bet that we’ve got them. Next, we will want to download those links. You can probably pipe that one-liner into wget, but I wasn’t ready to download when I wrote it, so I saved the text for later. Here’s how I eventually used it with wget:

    wget –user-agent=”iTunes/10.6.1″ -c -i out.txt

    It appears that Blip.tv white-lists your user-agent, so it knows to not allow wget, or probably a slew of other bots and/or browsers. You can find this out if you can download a file in your browser but running something automated on the site results in redirects and file fragments. There’s always a workaround. If you trick it into thinking you are iTunes, you not only get access to the files, but also get them faster than if you just manually downloaded from your browser (throttle-free!). Very nice. So after feeding the text file into wget, the .mov files download rather quickly. You don’t get the nice fancy file names like with youtube-dl, but you do get the files.

    So there. Only took an hour or two to work everything out.

     

    Well, as you can see, I’m finishing up a few parts of SaveRev3. Unfortunately, there is still work to be done and the list keeps on growing.

    Here’s to another summer of hard drives and bandwidth. It’s going to be a hot one.