[UPDATE] [WANTED] Language Technology / Electric Word Magazine

A little while ago, I was contacted by a gentleman by the handle of jonur who saw my post and decided to upload some scans of Language Technology / Electric Word magazine that he has done.

This is truly awesome, and we now have seven issues to browse through currently! Though this is not the entire collection, it is an awesome start.

The issues are:

Language Technology Issue 3 (September/October 1987)
Language Technology Issue 6 (March/April 1988)
Language Technology Issue 9 (September/October 1988)
Electric Word Issue 13 (May/June 1989)
Electric Word Issue 15 (September/October 1989)
Electric Word Issue 16 (November/December 1989)
Electric Word Issue 20 (July/August 1990)

 

[WANTED] Language Technology / Electric Word Magazine

Language Technology / Electric Word was a technology magazine running from 1987 to 1990, edied by Louis Rossetto who later went on to start Wired Magazine.

Unfortunately, I can’t find any issues of these publications, and little is available online beyond the Wikipedia page which states:

Electric Word was a bimonthly, English-language magazine published in Amsterdam between 1987 and 1990 that offered eclectic reporting on the translation industry, linguistic technology, and computer culture. Its editor was Louis Rossetto.

The magazine was launched under the title Language Technology by a translation company in Amsterdam, INK International. It was later renamed Electric Word and sold to a small Dutch media company. The magazine was terminated in 1990 due to insufficient revenues.

Electric Word was one of the first magazines published using desktop publishing software. It featured avant-garde graphics by the Dutch graphic designer Max Kisman.

After the failure of Electric Word, Rossetto and his partner Jane Metcalfe moved to San Francisco, California and established Wired Magazine.

Luckily, there is a defunct website located at http://rynne.org/electricword. Though the website is dead, we can see some cached information with the help of the Wayback Machine. Looking at this cached version of the site, https://web.archive.org/web/20100308041827/http://www.rynne.org/electricword, we can see some information about the publication and also note that some issues were released for PDF download. These are: #3, #5, #7, #20.

The PDFs were originally hosted at:

http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew3.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew5.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew7.pdf
http://rynne.org/electricword/pdfs/ltew20.pdf

Now long gone, I can find no trace of these PDFs or even any issues online for sale.

Any help or information about locating any issues would be extremely helpful! We’re looking at a lost prototype for Wired magazine.

 

[WANTED] Chromed Pork Radio

Recently, I’ve been on the hunt for cyberpunk podcasts. Between the sci-fi dramas and current news shows, I found a surprising amount of references to Chromed Pork, an interesting podcast by a group of phone phreaks and hackers that ran for 22 episodes from early 2008 to early 2009.

Chromed Pork seems to have started out as a group of friends on IRC. They came together (originally or later I don’t know) on Binary Revolution, a hacking website which previously ran the popular Binary Revolution Radio show and published its own zine. The radio show has since been merged into Hacker Public Radio, though BinRev is kept alive through forums and IRC. I have been a member of the BinRev forums for 10 years now and missed this show when it first premiered. In 2008, the podcast scene was more immature but still well established. There was an explosion of content and it proved hard to keep up.

Chromed Pork Radio Logo

Chromed Pork Radio Logo

The BinRev forums do have archival posts, and I can find accounts for three hosts of Chromed Pork Radio: Multi-Mode, tacomaster, and Inode. Communication with them seems difficult. The most recent login date for any of these three accounts is 2010, and tacomaster’s email address on his profile returns as unreachable if you try to push to it.

I did a little more digging on Chromed Pork’s old blogspot site which contains old number scans and podcast show notes. I found links to episodes that have since died, apparently hosted on a “mobile-node.net” domain. This domain now points to yet another domain, but I’m not sure of that domain owner’s involvement if any. I’ve reached out to him and still hope to hear back one way or the other, but no word yet. I also found an old Chromed Pork general email address, but this too is deactivated.

Later, I reached out to /u/r3dk1ng on Reddit whom I saw posting about Chromed Pork, and he was able to get me a good amount (15/22) of episodes which I have since put on the Internet Archive here.

For reference, here is a list of the files I am still looking for:

ChromedPork-0012-Assorted_Bullsh-t.mp3
ChromedPork-0013-Phreaking.mp3
ChromedPork-0014-Guest-Wesley_Mcgrew.mp3
ChromedPork-0015-Newscasting.mp3
ChromedPork-0018-Porktopia_Election-Night.mp3
ChromedPork-0019-MC-Colo_and_other_news.mp3
ChromedPork-0020-Killing_Time.mp3

And here is a description of the podcast from the defunct radio.chromedpork.net site:

Chromed Pork Radio is an open information security “podcast”, featuring a variety of security related topics, such Info and Comms Sec, Telephony, Programming, Electronics and Amateur Radio. We do our best to work on an open contribution model, meaning any listener is a potential host. We do not censor our shows but do ask that contributors keep all contributions purely informational or hypothetical. Contributions should consist only of material the contributor is legally entitled to share.
Given our open uncensored model, the views and opinions expressed in this “podcast” are strictly those of the contributor. The contents of this “podcast” are not reviewed or approved by Chromed Pork Media.
If you would like to contribute, or provided feedback please visit our contribute section for details.

My trail has gone cold, and I’m still on the lookout for the remaining episodes or anyone who may have them.

 

[WANTED] Videostatic (1989)

Through a strange series of links, I have become aware of a 1989 film called Videostatic. Distributed independently for $10/tape, Videostatic looks like some sort of insane hodgepodge of clips and video effects that I am strangely drawn to.

med129

Here is a synopsis written around 1998 from Gareth Branwyn’s Street Tech,

This is a 60-minute audio-visual journey to the edges of alternative art-making and experimental video. The tape is divided up into four sections: “Poems” (intuitive, non-narrative, alogical), “Paintings” (video equivalent to the conventional canvas), “Stories” (Event-based sequences), and “Messages” (rhetorical stances, public “service” announcements). The most impressive pieces here are “Sex with the Dead,” a video memory-jog of our morbidly nostalgic culture by Joe Schwind, “Of Thee I Sing/Sing/Sing,” a musique concrete video by Linda Morgan-Brown and the Tape-Beatles, and “Glossolalia,” (Steve Harp) an absolutely mind-fucking excursion into language, synaesthetic experience, and the structuring of human thought and perception. Surrounded by the curious, the kooky, and the just plain boring (as kook-tech artist Douglass Craft likes to say: “Not every experiment was a success.”) At only $10, this is an insane bargain.

Videostatic compilers John Heck and Lloyd Dunn (of Tape-Beatles’ fame) plan on putting out a series of these tapes. As far as we know, 1989 is the latest release. Write for more info (or to submit material).

ACCESS:
Videostatic
911 North Dodge St.
Iowa City, IA 52245
$10/ 60-minute VHS cassette

I’m looking for this in any format, digital or physical.

I’m not quite sure what I’m in store for.

med130

EDIT: Here is some additional information from the PhotoStatic Archive,

VideoStatic 1989 was released in June, 1989. It is a video compilation along much the same lines as the PhonoStatic cassettes. It contains roughly an hour of video and film work by both networking artists and Iowa City locals. It was edited by John Heck and Lloyd Dunn. At the time of this writing (6/90) VideoStatic 1990 was not yet begun, but plans are underway. It will be edited by Linda-Morgan Brown and Lloyd Dunn.

 

[WANTED] How to Build A Red Box VHS

I was looking though old issues of Blacklisted! 411 and found an advertisement in a 1995 issue for a 60 minute VHS tape about how to build a red box using a Radio Shack pocket tone dialer. For those who don’t know, red boxes were popular in the ’90s and used by phreakers, scammers, and those who just wanted free payphone calls. By modifying pocket dialers (or even just recording sounds that coins made as they were dropped into a phone), anyone could make a red box which would mimic the tones produced when coins were inserted into a payphone. This means that anywhere you take your red box, you can play back the tones and get free phone calls.

Anyway, this video was made and sold in 1995 by East America Company in Englewood, New Jersey. It retailed for $39 (Plus $5 shipping) and I would love a copy. See the image below for a review of the tape and the original advertisement.

redbox

 

[WANTED] Let’s Find All The TechTV VHS Tapes

TechTV, the 24-hour technology-oriented cable channel was a never ending source of inspiration to me when I was growing up. Back then, TechTV was only available in my area on digital cable, a newfangled platform that people didn’t want to pay the extra money for. By the time I had ditched analog cable, TechTV was long gone, absorbed into G4, with any programming carried over reduced to a shell of its former self.

Back in the heyday (2001-2002 for this example), TechTV decided to release direct-to-video VHS tapes of various one-off programs and specials designed as something of an informational/instructional reference. I remember these being advertised, and the concept excited me as it was a way to get TechTV content without needing the cable service. That said, I never got to view a single one of these tapes. Unfortunately, they were priced a just a little too high. It was a big financial investment for an hour of content.

Over a decade later, a few of these tapes have made their way online. By my research, I can find that TechTV produced six (Maybe more?) VHS tapes, three of which some kind souls have digitized and put on YouTube or The Internet Archive. But, that means that there are three other tapes out there which I or anyone else have a hard time getting at unless we want to spend a bunch of money working our way through Amazon resellers. Not something I want to do. To add to this, the digitized videos available online are not the best quality. Again, thanks to the kind souls who went through the trouble, but I would really like to see the maximum quality squeezed out of these bad boys. Over the years, there have been many efforts to find old TechTV recordings from over-the-air, but these tapes remain mostly lost.

Let’s try to fix that.

I’ve created a project page to track as much information as I can on these tapes and am looking for any people who can create digital rips themselves or send these tapes my way to rip. I can’t offer any money to buy them, but you’ll be doing a good service getting these videos out there. Once again, I would like to find fresh sources for each of the tapes listed if possible.

The titles I can find existing are as follows, let me know if I missed any:

  • TechTV’s Digital Audio for the Desktop (2001)
  • TechTV’s How to Build Your Own PC (2001)
  • TechTV’s Digital Video for the Desktop (2002)
  • TechTV Solves Your Computer Problems (2002)
  • TechTV’s How to Build a Website (2002)
  • TechTV’s How to Build a Website (2002)
  •